June Beer of the Month - Belgian Blonde

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June Beer of the Month - Belgian Blonde

This dry, fruity and slightly spicy Belgian Abbey Ale is a complex mix of strength and intrigue. Light bitterness balances out the clove spiciness and citrus like zest from this traditional abbey ale yeast strain. 

Our No Brainer Blonde is a perfect beer for those warmer summer months. Ferment toward the cooler end of the temperature range for a cleaner spicer feel, more toward the upper end will give you more estery / boozy feel. 

If you are going to experiment, a minor addition of coriander and orange peel towards the end of the boil will make this Belgian blonde more wit like. Another fun tweak would be to add 1-2 lbs of Belgian Pilsner malt to add more grainy flavor to the mix. 

Blondes DO have all the fun!

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April Beer Of  The Month - German Hefeweizen

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April Beer Of The Month - German Hefeweizen

April showers bring May flowers. What do May flowers bring? German Wheat Beers!

Our Fig Street Wheat is a stronger version of our traditional wheat beer, more fuller and richer. Warmer temperatures will bring out the banana flavors of the German Hef yeast. Or use the more spicy and clove like Safale -WB 06. Or if you want to add some seasonal fruit the Amercian Hef yeast will lay low and let the fruit do all the speaking. So many options. 

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March Beer Of The Month - Irish Dry Stout

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March Beer Of The Month - Irish Dry Stout

The Irish Dry Stout is one of the most common stouts. It has a characteristic dry finish due to the generous additions of unmalted roasted barley. This tends to give the beer a more bitter flavor, think the type of bitterness you get from coffee.

One question people have is, what is the difference between a stout and a porter?

It mostly comes down to historical distinctions that are not especially relevant today. Stouts were originally called stout porters, signifying a stronger version of the porter. As such, many people associate Irish Dry Stouts as having a higher alcohol content, but that is mostly false. Most Irish Dry Stouts have a lower alcohol percentage than other types of beer.

For March we have a special Irish Dry Stout recipe, our Cypress Stout. This is a richer, stronger version of our Silverlake Stout. It tones down the roasted barley while adding some chocolate malt and some flaked barley for richness and flavor. Here is the recipe. Happy St. Patricks Day, Thursday March 17th. 

 

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April 10th All Grain Class

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April 10th All Grain Class

We are doing it again! Back by popular demand we will be offering our all grain class to go over taking your beer to the next level. This is a longer than normal class covering the entire mashing process so lunch will be provided. Space is limited to 20 people and this is an event we only hold once a year, so reserve your spot now!

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February Beer of the Month - Irish Red

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February Beer of the Month - Irish Red

We are here to help you get ready for St. Patrick's Day (Which is Thursday March 17th). To that end we need to start a beer in the next two weeks or so. Typically we would do the Irish Dry Stout (similar to Guinness), but lets explore some of the more colorful varieties of Irish Ale. 

The Irish Red is an adaptation of the popular English Bitter style, but with less hops and a bit of roast to add to the color and dryness.

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Jan 9th Yeastside Meeting

Stop by the store on Jan 9th to meet homebrewing legends, it is a Yeastside Brewers Club Meeting!. Mingle with brew nerds as they talk about their tasty creations. You can even join the homebrewing club and get 5% off all merchandise all year round!

The club meeting is rain or shine. Hopefully shine and we can enjoy the outdoors, but if it rains we will just bring the party inside.

See ya there.

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January Beer Of The Month - Russian Imperial Stout

In 2016, we are going to do a monthly beer highlight.

To kick things off, we will start with the Russian Imperial Stout (BJCP 20C)

This is a very strong (8-12%), very dark (SRM 30+) beer with complex maltiness, a high hoppiness and a good one to let age out. I am packing up my apartment now and just found a case I made probably 2 years ago. Unlike all my other beers I found this one is still drinkable.

I like to make one at the beginning of the year and then taste a bottle or two a month as the year goes on.

And to coincide with the release of Star Wars Episode 7, we present our house recipe, The Imperial Death Star Stout:

Malt Extract: Pale 12 lbs. (Twice a normal beer!)

Grain Bill:

British Chocolate Malt 6 oz
Roasted Barley 8 oz
Black Patent 4 oz

Hopping Schedule:

#1 Northern Brewer (10%) 3.0 oz 60 min
#2 Northern Brewer (10%) 1.0 oz 15 min
#3 Fuggles 1.0 oz 0 min

Starting Gravity: 1.095

Fermentation Temp:  65-75 degrees F

Yeast: Nottingham (2 packets) + Champagne Yeast

This is very strong beer and to get to our target, we may need to add the Champagne yeast once our Nottingham gets past 12% or so. We may also need to add some fresh yeast right before bottling, since the higher alcohol content will make it hard for our old yeast to carbonate our beer.

 

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